13
May

Moomins hang in there — in 3D
Beloved local characters get a digital makeover
May 12, 2010
By GUNNAR REHLIN
Variety

With an all-star Scandi voice cast and enhanced by stereoscopic 3D digital animation, the Moomin family is ready to continue its conquest of the world via the bigscreen.

Created by Finnish author Tove Jansson in 1945, the Moomins are trolls who look like hippos. Through seven novels, a string of comic books and various TV series, the Moomins have become well known worldwide. They even have their own amusement park near Finland’s coastal city of Abo.

Cannes will host the world preem of feature “Moomins and the Comet Chase,” helmed by Maria Lindberg and produced by Tom Carpelan for Filmkompaniet.

The voice cast is headed by Swedes Stellan and Alexander Skarsgard, Peter Stormare and Max von Sydow. Icelandic rock star Bjork wrote and performs the title song. Carpelan hopes to bring as many as possible of the participating celebs to Cannes for the premiere party.

Carpelan says the film has nothing in common with the Japanese TV series of the 1990s.

“Our film is based on the animated Polish TV series of the 70′s that Tove Jansson herself was involved with,” he adds. “We have all the rights to this material, and we remade it all and remastered it in 3D. We decided on 3D several years ago and had no idea there would be a 3D boom. I could hug James Cameron.”

The old TV series had no dialogue, just a narrator. New dialogue was written for the feature, and Carpelan opted for high-profile Scandi voices for the English version. Stellan Skarsgard voices Moominpapa while his son Alexander plays Moomintroll, Stormare voices Snufkin and von Sydow is the narrator.

With the Moomins already familiar to kids around the world — the books have been translated into over 40 languages — there’s no shortage of merchandising tie-ins. However, “the owners are very keen on keeping their integrity,” Carpelan says. “We were given a free hand, but knew that with this came a lot of responsibility.”

The film will be sold in Cannes by NonStop. Scandinavia is already in the bag with Nordisk handling distribution in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

27
Apr

March 18, 2010
Samantha Chang
Examiner.com

Swedish actor Stellan Skarsgard is proud of his son, True Blood star Alexander Skarsgard, calling Alex, 33, “wiser, more beautiful and better than I was.”

That’s high praise coming from Stellan, 58, himself a respected actor who has starred in numerous films, including Good Will Hunting (1997), Ronin (1998), Pirates of the Caribbean (2006 & 2007), Mamma Mia! (2008) and Angels & Demons (2009).

‘WHY CAN’T YOU BE A NORMAL DAD?’

Growing up, Stellan says his six kids (including Alexander) wished he were more like other dads who had “normal jobs.”

“At a certain age they thought it was so embarrassing [that I was an actor],” the elder Skarsgård tells Good Evening Norway.

He recalls: “When Alexander was 7, he asked me, ‘Why can not you be like a normal dad? Why can’t you work with computers and run Saab?” They wanted me to be like all the other dads.”

Now, there are four actors in the Skarsgård family: Alexander and his brothers Gustaf, 30, Sam, 28, and Bill, 20. Of his actor sons, doting dad Stellan says, “They’re wiser, more handsome and better than I was, so there is a clear evolutionary process that is underway.”

Read the rest at Examiner.com

27
Apr

May 2010 issue of Details
Meghan Daum
Details.com


(c) Details Magazine, Photographer Norma Jean Roy

Three weeks before Alexander Skarsgård was scheduled to leave his native Stockholm, Sweden, for acting school in New York, he met a girl and fell in love. He went overseas anyway, promising to sustain the relationship from 4,000 miles away. This was back in 1997, before Skype and ubiquitous e-mail, and Skarsgård was broke. He couldn’t afford to talk to his girlfriend for more than a few minutes at a time, much less bring her over for a visit, and he was too proud to ask his dad—who just happens to be the film star Stellan Skarsgård—for money. He loved his acting program at Marymount Manhattan College, but he found the city lonely and exhausting. He lived in a student-housing building with a permanently broken elevator, which forced him to walk nine flights up to his room. When he couldn’t take that anymore, he moved into a “tiny closet” in Times Square that he calls “the worst possible location to live in New York City.” In the meantime, the girlfriend across the Atlantic started making noises about going back to her old boyfriend. Read the rest of this entry »